Posted by: photochika42 | November 20, 2010

CBQM – Film Critique

The title of the documentary I went to see is “CBQM” – which is the name of a radio station. The initials CBQM are short for “Come Back Quick Mom”. The intended audience of this documentary was adults.

The purpose of the documentary was to show how the radio is the focus of this community. The message that the director wanted to get across was that the community relies upon this radio for entertainment, news, announcements, and messages from listeners to other listeners. In a way, the radio station CBQM is a lifeline for this arctic community.

Before I saw “CBQM”, I knew that it was about a radio station in a small community, and that members of this community were involved with entertaining one another through the radio. In the film, a majority of senior citizens were involved with running the station and providing entertainment through the station. I was expecting more involvement from younger community members to help draw in some of the younger community members. I was curious about this radio station, and they just allowed anyone to go on the air without any prior screening or questioning about what their timeframe will include.

The subject of the documentary is the radio station CBQM. The radio station is located in an arctic community in Canada. The documentary is about certain programs that air on CBQM. One of the main events during the documentary is when the radio station moves from one building to another building. The station had to be shut down for two days so the move could occur. One of the other main events is the radio bingo, where people who want to play bingo go to the station, pay for their bingo cards, and then go home and listen to the numbers being called over the radio. If they got bingo, then they would call into the radio station and tell the announcer that they won. The winner would have to go down to the station with the winning card in order to claim a prize, which was money.

The majority of the sound effects included in this film were sound bites from broadcasts at CBQM. The images are sharp. The images were not blurry or too dark in any way. The filming was strong, the majority of the camera angles that were used were establishing shots, medium close-ups, or close-ups. Establishing shots were mainly used to show scenery, the medium close-ups were used for conversations or when someone was broadcasting, and the close-ups were normally on a radio or a certain object before a new scene began. I liked the interviews because they informed the audience about what events were happening, or about the way the station is run. There were not any special effects to my knowledge, except for the possibility of additional lighting to the shot.

The part that I most enjoyed from this documentary was the fact that these announcers or workers for the radio station always enjoyed themselves. There was lots of laughter throughout the documentary. I learned that radio is still used as a major news source and a lifeline. I know that more people are turning to the internet or to the daily news on television in order to get the news, and I normally do not hear of many people turning to the radio for their news. What surprised me in this film was that there was one police officer (or the equivalent in Canada) for this whole town, and he did announce some messages and warning to the CBQM community. One of the drawbacks to this documentary was that it was very dry, and that there was not a whole lot of excitement throughout the film. I also felt that another drawback to this documentary was that the radio station was community focused, which could be confusing to an outsider who might be visiting the town. I would not recommend this documentary to my friends because I feel that they are not interested in how radio affects a small town in Canada. My friends and I have similar taste, and since I was not a huge fan of this documentary, I do not feel that they would enjoy it either.


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